1963 Mk1 MORRIS COOPER XFY 524 Green & White. WHERE ARE YOU?

10 comments

  1. imported post

    Hello there Mark. Check out the DVLA website [url=http://www.vehiclelicence.gov.uk/EvlPortalApp/application;JSESSIONID_EvlPortalApp=EAHWu8CfyXBdC4i2JGGbiK02USL2ELAIAUwQHBboraA1UnzpaVzd!-1268609551!182026566?pageid=Vehicle+Enquiry&portletid=VehicleEnquiry&portletns=VehicleEnquiry_en&wfevent=link.next]http://www.vehiclelicence.gov.uk/EvlPortalApp/application;JSESSIONID_EvlPortalApp=EAHWu8CfyXBdC4i2JGGbiK02USL2ELAIAUwQHBboraA1UnzpaVzd!-1268609551!182026566?pageid=Vehicle+Enquiry&portletid=VehicleEnquiry&portletns=VehicleEnquiry_en&wfevent=link.next[/url] It says that the car was due for retaxing in 1985. What is HPI ? My own 997 is still on file but I think she's been broken up. DVLA wont give out owner details. :shock:Good luck. Steve.

  2. 18 years ago I sold my first Mini, XFY 524, a 1963 Mk1 Morris Cooper in green and white. She was a Southport/Lancashire registered car. I seem to recall the buyer was from Cheshire. I know through HPI the car was still around as recently as 1999 but would love to know whether she still exists and where she is. 😕

  3. imported post

    Hi Steve. An Experian HPI check is open to everyone but it does cost money (unless you have a friend in a car dealership who can sneak it for free!). It tells you if the car has been written off/stolen, etc, and also states the number of owners and the last change of keeper.

    I know therefore that when I sold it on 09/05/1989, it changed hands again on 17/06/1999. Strange that it has never been taxed since I put it in dry storage in 1985, although she was still around 14 years later and passing from owner to owner. She was a very clean and original car back in 1989 and by 1999 the owner must have realised she was a rare car.

    I remember like it was yesterday when I first bought her in the early eighties from an old chap in Southport, and drove her home on a sunny autumn day down the coast road to the sound of a twin carb A series. My first Mini experience. Wonderful!

  4. imported post

    MMM :(40 quid just to find out last change of owner is a bit steep consideringmy car probably is melted down by now. If only I could trace the last keeper, I could purchase the log book and rebuild my 1964 project as a Cooper, as most parts are being re-manufactured now. Cant help wondering just how many cars have been broken up and not notified, so that they are still on the DVLA computer. Quite a few that I have checked myself are still on the database, but without info on the last keeper, the cars cant be recreated. Never mind I can still make a Cooper, but it wont have my old number from 30 years ago. :?Steve.

  5. imported post

    If your old car was ATE913A a HPI check reveals the last change of keeper was 01/12/1984, and on 10/03/1985 the colour was changed from red/black to red/white.

    The engine listed is a 1275cc number 12H/298F/24964. The chassis number was CA2S7449120 and it was first registered 21/11/1963 with a grand total of 6 owners.

    With not much happening in 20 yrs looks like it's gone to the old Mini hunting ground in the sky. With a red/white colour change that sounds like motor sport material. Perhaps it died happy with its boots on.:D

  6. imported post

    [b]MARKSAXTON wrote: [/b] “If your old car was ATE913A a HPI check reveals the last change of keeper was 01/12/1984, and on 10/03/1985 the colour was changed from red/black to red/white.

    The engine listed is a 1275cc number 12H/298F/24964. The chassis number was CA2S7449120 and it was first registered 21/11/1963 with a grand total of 6 owners.

    With not much happening in 20 yrs looks like it's gone to the old Mini hunting ground in the sky. With a red/white colour change that sounds like motor sport material. Perhaps it died happy with its boots on.:D

    Many thanks Mark. If I can now ascertain that the old girl definitely perished, then we have a potential Doctor Who-style regeneration. We have the technology. :cool:Steve.

  7. imported post

    WATCH OUT FOR THE DALEKS!;)

    But seriously, I think half the Cooper S's on the road today have been regenerated. Providing people are honest and not ripping unsuspecting buyers off, I don't see why the DVLA should not allow old identities of a once cherished car to be retained if they were never officially lost, although it's a very grey area.

    Regeneration is a green issue. I am all for keeping old cars on the road instead of churning out millions of new ones we don't really need. Old Minis will help save the planet!

    But there is a money issue. Nobody will spend thousands to save a car worth hundreds. However, regardless of its identity a saved classic Mini is a saved Classic Mini that otherwise might die.

    Unfortunately there are too many modified standard 60's Minis driving around on Cooper S identities. If they are sold on as rebuilt cars for realistic money I think people would accept that and be happy to buy them. Too many however are sold for crazy money to unsuspecting buyers.

    Ancient Chinese proverb say, beware the shiny 'S' on ebay!:D

  8. imported post

    I would agree there about silly prices. My immaculate Cooper sold, I think for about £300 in 1980, much less than what it cost me to restore. However, it was a reshell, because the original was u.s after just 13 years. Nowadays, strangely enough, it is much easier to do a faithful rebuild because of the internet and also, many of the bits that were getting scarce back then, are being made again, such as interior trim etc. As for daft prices, people should do their research before bidding blind for a possibly non-original car. Incidentally, my local mini specialists quoted £7500 plus for a complete bare metal stripdown and rebuild.:shock: Steve.

  9. imported post

    £7500!!!:shock:That's ridiculous. Is it any wonder rotten Coopers are being reshelled into cleaner, lesser models. Soon it will end up 850's are worth a fortune and Coopers cheap because all the 850's have been sacrificed to reshell them.

    Seriously, surely Heritage or M-Machine and the likes can get together to produce a brand new mk1 and mk2 bodyshell. They wouldn't need to commission too much in extra tooling/panels over what is already available. If not an exact replica shell they would be able to get pretty damn close.

    Surely there is a big market for new Mk1/2 shells. What is the point in building new Mk4/5's when in truth, few if any Mk4/5's are worth reshelling. Even a mk3 would be nice. A mk4 could be very easily built as a Mk3 in the factory by changing just a few readily available panels and give authentic new life to early GTs and the last Mk3 Coopers.

    Would anyone connected to the body panel/shell builders care to expand on that?:?

  10. imported post

    Hi Mark! Did you ever trace your car? I just found out off the DVLA that my oldcar has no current recorded keeper, but I am still trying to locate the last one. Good luck! Steve.

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