works cars door number font?

22 comments

  1. im recreating a works style mini and im currently adding door squares and numbers but cant find the right style of number so im looking for a font which matches the style of those used on the doors of the works cars. Anybody point me in the right direction?

    thanks

  2. imported post

    Hi,

    If you can e-mail me a clear photo of a car with numbers, I'll get a signwriter/screenprinter friend to identify them, he's pretty good at it.

    Regards

    al

  3. bumping an old thread, does anyone know the font for the works minis? It always looks the same in photos from oh about 63-68 – this one: [URL]http://www.flickr.com/photos/cclontz/3314986770/in/photostream/[/URL]

  4. pad wrote: “No Its not – hang on – having a brain freeze !!!!!!”

    This is unusual your'e brain alway's smoked like a bush fire, when youre thinking :p

  5. Im working on this – there are similar but I cant bloody remember the exact font !!! – its pretty unique as the stroke widths are uniform, plus the characters are very uniform, especially the 9, its the 3 that gives us the problems as the tails are cut short.

    Its a 1940s font i think, never been used much in recent times, Ill make a few calls on monday see if i can track it down

  6. Its stumping everyone i ask – its very similar to a commercial font but the way the ends are chopped at an angle – beginning to wonder if its a handwritten font, im still on with it though

  7. closest I have come is 'Geometric 231 Heavy', seen below

    [IMG]http://img571.imageshack.us/img571/2531/screenshot20100711at511.png[/IMG]

    however the 2 especially looks wrong.

    the font needs to have a one with no top end, a 5 where the vertical stroke isnt vertical, etc

  8. hanlminima wrote: “Surely the Ex Works registrar knows what font was used! Why has he not responded? Is it that secret?”

    He could tell you ,but then he'd have to kill you !!

  9. Well actually, I'm sorry but I don't know everything. Abingdon numbers were always Hand painted on anyway, so would be to the style of the signwriter. All I ever did was carefully scale the script from photographs and made them up myself from sticky back plastic, a la Blue Peter. That was close enough for me and others. Sorry I can't help.

    Robert

  10. Robert
    Thanks. That is exactly what I thought would be the answer as I recall from my youth in the 1960's, that signwriting was not related to 'fonts' as it is now but the art of the 'Sign' writer and I seem to recall that in those days numbers were painted on the squares. One of my first jobs as a 'junior' event marshal in the 1960's was to paint numbers on to competitors cars with 'plimsol' cleaner. Those were the days and yes I was too artistic with the number 2 and soon learned the error of my ways.

  11. Yea – i cant find nothing like it – i worked in the sign industry for years – old skool, spent years hand drawing letters up for the guys in the workshop and while the font is similar to allsorts, there is just nothing thats quite right….

  12. youngre wrote: “Well actually, I'm sorry but I don't know everything. Abingdon numbers were always Hand painted on anyway, so would be to the style of the signwriter. All I ever did was carefully scale the script from photographs and made them up myself from sticky back plastic, a la Blue Peter. That was close enough for me and others. Sorry I can't help.

    Robert”

    I always thought the numbers were painted on for most early events, as I never saw a picture of a Works car with torn numbers. I say most early events because on some events the organisers provided the competition numbers for each competitor. The 1966 RAC Rally is an example of this exception when the number background was an orange circle to recognise the Sun Newspaper sponsorship. The height and width of the numbers though were surely laid down by International/National standing regulations. My earliest RAC Blue Book is 1967 (sad I know, but I always knew I'd need it one day!) which specifies that '… competition numbers…figures, the outline of which shall be between 11 and 12 inches high and 2 inches wide'. Over the years, timekeepers eyesight must have improved as they became smaller. Monte Carlo Rally numbers always seemed to be larger than for other events, so perhaps the ACM used their own rules for numbers (as well as lights!).

    So Littlenik probably needs to decide which rally his replica would have entered to be sure of the correct size! Also, driving around with numbers on the doors when not competing is largely frowned upon by serious competitors, the MSA and the authorities. Although many do it, and the authorities don't do much about it these days.

    Pete

  13. ama wrote: “Hi,
    The white font on doors was painted old english white, or adhesive sticker?
    Thanks”

    Wow, this has been quiet for some time!
    The rules for International events in the mid to late 1960s required black numbers on a white background. The build sheets for the works Minis and MGs (and one would assume the Healey 3000s were the same) indicate the numbers were painted on using matt black paint. So as Youngres points out, the style of the 'painter' would come into it, so long as they met the basic requirement of height and width – see my previous reply above.
    Looking at the 3 cars at Gaydon, the shade of white used for the backgrounds seems to match the roof shade of white, so certainly Old English White (quite a creamy white) for Mk1 Minis and maybe Snowberry White for Mk2s.

    Someone else might like to confirm that Mk2s used the current shade of white for the roof.

    Fablon was always quite a white colour so wouldn't match the roof colour. Hence I doubt it was used for the door squares. Interestingly, the build sheets indicate Fablon was used for the background for number plates, but surely it would have been easier to use the after market stick on backgrounds rather than spend time cutting out Fablon. Fablon is not very durable and shreds from wind/dust/gravel/water damage. Also it is getting hard to buy it these days.
    Pete

  14. Pete wrote: “The rules for International events in the mid to late 1960s required black numbers on a white background. ”

    No, that came later. Ford, for example, often used black circles with white numbers on a red car (Cortina) that was contemporary to the works Minis.
    FIA regs actually specified larger numbers than UK (then RAC) events, not that it was always complied with…

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